Bathroom Floor Tiling Project – SnapStone Tiles Toilet Installation

Yesterday we saw the progression of the SnapStone tiles on the bathroom floor, starting at the wall with the sink, because it is where we have the floor heating / cooling vent, and progressing to the other side of the wall.

Today I wanted to show you the progression of the tile in the area by the toilet.

If you recall, Bennett temporarily placed a few SnapStone tiles in place so he could mark the area of the toilet’s flange on the porcelain floor tiles to indicate where he needed to cut them.

measuring and marking flange cut in tile Bathroom Floor Tiling Project   SnapStone Tiles Toilet Installation

Once the cut was done, with a small hand miter, he was then able to place the cut tiles around the toilet flange.

snapstone floor tile around toilet flange Bathroom Floor Tiling Project   SnapStone Tiles Toilet Installation

This was quickly followed by laying the tiles in the remaining two rows.

eight rows of floor tiles Bathroom Floor Tiling Project   SnapStone Tiles Toilet Installation

And then the last row of full (uncut) tiles plus the row of thinly cut tiles up against the wall as shown below:

nine rows of floor tile Bathroom Floor Tiling Project   SnapStone Tiles Toilet Installation

Notice that the tiles against the wall are very narrow.  This was intentional for this particular situation.

Remember that on the opposite wall, the one with the sink, there was the floor air vent only a few inches from that wall. We made a conscious decision to have the full tile against that sink wall. This would result in having the cut in the tile for the floor vent as centered within the tiles as possible in order to provide maximum strength should anyone stand on those tiles.

So, once the toilet is back in place, as shown below, part of the thinly cut tiles are hidden:

toilet installed on new floor tiles Bathroom Floor Tiling Project   SnapStone Tiles Toilet Installation

As well, against that wall is a 3 and 1/2 foot wide bathroom cupboard which will also hide the thin row of tiles; so will the floor board once it is also reinstalled.

Yes, Bennett made the conscious decision to install the toilet onto the SnapStone tiles before the grouting. Personally I don’t think it matters. He made this decision because our special needs daughter who uses this bathroom needed to have the toilet reinstalled for her special needs as soon as possible and Bennett would not return for a couple of days for the grouting.

Select this link to continue to the next part in our bathroom floor tiling project.

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Comments

  1. Elizabeth says:

    I noticed you did not put down any of the backer board over the wood floor. Is there a reason? Backer board is very expensive but everything I’ve read says you have to use it. I’d love to get away with not using it, but have read the grout and tiles will crack more without it.

    Thanks

    • Dan says:

      Hi Elizabeth,
      The plywood we used over the wood sub-flooring worked fine for us. However, I would go with the recommended installation if that is what the manufacturer indicates and you hope to go back to them for cracking tiles. At the time I was not aware that this was a requirement of theirs.
      Dan

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